Category Archives: Halifax RC Park

Posts about the Halifax RC Park in Beaverbank

Buy a $10 ticket – Win an R/C Car

So we last posted about the poor financial situation of Halifax R/C Park, and this is how you can help us keep the track open for 2018. Just buy a $10 ticket, or two, three… for our fundraising raffle.

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With the support of Mighty Small Cars (MSC) in Dartmouth, we’re able to offer the following limited-ticket raffle. Starting today, if you buy a $10 ticket, you receive 1 of only 200 available tickets to win a radio controlled car – some ready to run, and some in kit form. Just send an etransfer to halifaxrcpark@gmail.com, or cash payments can be arranged by sending an email to the same address. We will need your contact details (email, phone, address) to accompany your payment. In return we’ll send you an email/text with a photo of your physical ticket with your unique ticket number and personal details written on it. We need to keep the original tickets for the draw which we’ll be doing live at MSC once we’ve sold all the tickets. We’ll also Facebook broadcast the draw for those that can’t make it in person. We’ll keep you updated here on http://www.halifaxrcpark.com to let you know how the ticket sales are going and when the draw will take place.  The raffle will run until all 200 tickets are sold but our hope is that we can sell all the tickets before mid December so that the winner can get their prize before Christmas. If we haven’t sold enough tickets by May 1st 2018, then we will be refunding your payments, and Halifax RC Park will be closing down 😦

We’ve tried hard to give a good selection of prizes to choose from, and the vehicles below fit with many of the local active RC groups:

Choice 1. Traxxas Slash 1/10 Short Course Truck (SCT) – The ever popular, and foundation of the modern Short Course Truck craze, the Slash is where most recent hobbyists began in RC. This current version has Traxxas stability management, and runs brushless power which means you can slot straight into the local and regional SCT groups and races. Take a look at this link to this model for what you can win: TRA68086. There’s a choice of 4 body colours, but you’ll require a battery and charger to get running.

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Choice 1 – Traxxas Slash 4×4 Brushless RTR (ex. battery and charger)

Choice 2. Axial SCX10-2 Trail Truck kit – This is the current version of the truck which launched the Trail Truck scene. And Trail Trucks are ever popular in Nova Scotia throughout the year – its a great RC activity for winters, and through the wet shoulder seasons. The SCX10-2 is well supported with aftermarket parts of all varieties and it really can be made to go anywhere. This is a kit version which requires assembly and the separate purchase of all the electronics (transmitter, receiver, servos), motor, battery, charger, paint etc. Check out Axial’s page for full details: AX90046

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Choice 2 – Axial SCX10-2 KIT

Choice 3. A pair of 1/10 ECX Torment 2WD trucks – This is the quick way for siblings, cousins, or families to start the RC hobby together. Not one, but two ready to run hobby-grade RC cars. The ECX Torment is great for beginners, and the large Short Course Bodies mean you can nudge each other ‘safely’ as you drive. These vehicles come with battery, charger and are completely ready to go right from the box. Two colours are available: ECX03333T1 and ECX03333T2

Choice 4. Tamiya TT02B 4WD buggy Ready to Build and Run – Those of you of advanced ages will likely remember Tamiya as the first mass-market hobby-grade RC vehicles. The Frog, Monster Beetle, Grasshopper and Boomerang are all memory worthy. Tamiya are still going strong with their excellent kits and unusual vehicle designs and there’s a local RC group devoted to Tamiya. Kit building is great fun and when you see something you’ve built turn its wheels for the first time, the sense of achievement is amazing. This prize is a ready-to-build 1/10 4WD TT02B off-road buggy which is a perfect match for the local play-racing Formula TT02B group and includes the buggy kit, speed controller, motor, a Spektrum DX2E radio and receiver, Kinexis KXSB2000EC lipo battery, Dynamite DYNC2005CA charger, and a suitable steering servo. Apart from a couple of screwdrivers, and some paint for the body, it’s everything you need to build and race an RC car.  There’s three body styles to choose from: Plasma Edge II #58630Neo Scorcher #58568 and Dual Ridge #58596.

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Choice 4 – Choice of Tamiya TT02B 4WD buggy kit and accessories to get it running

Choice 5. A $500 voucher to Mighty Small Cars, Dartmouth – if none of the above look interesting enough, then there’s always the option of a $500 voucher for MSC.

Good luck to everyone who enters, and as always feel free to email us at halifaxrcpark@gmail.com with questions.

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HRCP’s future rests in your hands

Although Halifax Radio Control Park in Beaverbank is free to use, it’s not actually free to operate. The small group of us making up the committee members of the Halifax RC Park Society (Reg Soc No: 3296396) have thanklessly donated their time, and often personal funds, in order to keep the park going. But finances are now exhausted.

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An exhausted RC

There are a series of ongoing expenses that have for the last 4 years been covered by the initial donations of discretionary funds from Councillors from the Sackville and BeaverBank areas. In the 4 years since we first opened in 2014, we’ve spent just over $5000 getting the park built, insured annually and maintained. However, without additional funds, the park will not be able to open for the 2018 season. The main condition placed upon us comes from the city, and although they allow us to use their land, they also require that we hold public liability insurance which costs us around $700 per year. This is the absolute minimum requirement of finance for 2018, but excludes any supplies for maintenance such as dirt, drainage pipe, stakes, zip ties, fuel, signage etc. The financial breakdown of a typical year maintaining and improving the Halifax RC Park is approximately $1500 made up of the following:

  • Insurance $700
  • Dirt – 1 or 2 loads at $300 a load
  • Track marking – pipe, stakes, zippers $200
  • Fuel for machinery used for maintenance $50

Were also planning on some much improved permanent signage as for some reason our “Rules” sign gets torn down within a couple of days of us putting it up.

To offset the financial needs required for us to open 2018, rather than just pleading for cash donations from you, over the next couple of weeks you’ll see the launch of a couple of fundraising schemes:

  1. A limited-ticket-raffle to win a choice of RC vehicles from Mighty Small Cars. $10 a ticket. 200 tickets maximum.
  2. Custom Halifax RC Park clothing for which we’ll receive a small commission.

Naturally, we’re investigating all funding options available to us, but we hope that the RC community will find it in their wallets to support the Halifax RC Park if you want to see it remain. Without the required funds, we’ll be forced to return the site back to the city.

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There’s work required to keep an RC park going

 

LiPo Battery Safety PSA

This is a bit of a Public Service Announcement regarding Lithium Polymer (LiPo) batteries. Over the past year I’ve purchased a couple of used RC cars that came with LiPo batteries. I didn’t need the batteries per-se, but the condition of the batteries when they arrived has made me wonder whether people really know how to properly care for them.

On the beginners page of this very website we have a section on batteries, including LiPos. It gives some basic information but I thought it’d be worth highlighting some of the critical aspects, as LiPo fires are certainly possible without the correct care.

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Aftermath of a LiPo fire in a pit area

And since the detail below is a bit wordy, here’s a quick summary:

  • DISCHARGING ANY INDIVIDUAL CELL BELOW 3v WILL DAMAGE IT
  • CHARGING ANY INDIVIDUAL CELL ABOVE 4.2v WILL DAMAGE IT.
  • ALWAYS BALANCE CHARGE
  • CHARGE AT 1C (the capacity of the battery in Amp)
  • CHARGE IN A LIPO SACK/BAG AND NEVER LEAVE CHARGING BATTERIES UNATTENDED 
  • SET YOUR ESCs LOW VOLTAGE CUTOFF (LVC) >3v/cell
  • (Optionally use a Low Voltage Alarm (LVA) plugged into the balance port set to >3v/cell)
  • RECHARGE TO 3.85v/CELL FOR STORAGE or
  • DISCHARGE A CHARGED PACK DOWN TO 3.85v/CELL FOR STORAGE
  • IF A BATTERY PUFFS UP, STOP USING IT

Overview of a LiPo

A LiPo pack is one built from ‘cells’. A single cell is nominally rated at 3.7v (volts) but operates between 3v and 4.2v depending upon state-of-charge. A LiPo pack made of a single cell is referred to as 1S. Therefore a 2S pack, is a battery, made of two 1S 3.7v cells totaling a battery pack of 7.4v. Likewise a 3S pack is made of three cells giving a total voltage of 11.1v.

The cables coming from the battery will include the main Positive (+ve) and negative (-ve) wires, but also a balance lead that links to the +ve and -ve  terminals of each individual cell inside. For a 2S pack, that balance lead has 3 wires allowing you (or your charger) to measure the voltage of each cell.

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Charging you LiPo

There’s is one mantra here – ALWAYS ALWAYS BALANCE CHARGE. That is when the voltage of each cell within a pack is monitored while charging. You’ll need to set your charger to the number of cells (1S-6S is typical) and to connect both the main connections, and the balance connector to your charger. The majority of the ‘juice’ is fed back into the battery via the main cables, but nearing the end of the charge, the charger carefully tops up each cell separately. A LiPo is fully charged when each of the cells within it reach 4.2v. CHARGING ANY INDIVIDUAL LIPO CELL ABOVE 4.2v WILL DAMAGE IT.

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Balance charge with balance plug into charger

As far as the charging rate goes, unless you’re totally running out of time (i.e. between heats at an important event) then it’s always best to CHARGE YOUR LIPOs AT 1C. C is a measure of capacity so if your pack is a 5000mAh (milli Amp Hour) then you charge at 5000mA = 5A. The charger begins charging at that rate until the cell voltages get nearer 4.2v and then the charging rate slows to a crawl when the charger smartly charges only the cell that needs the power. Charging is completed when each cell in the battery pack has a voltage of 4.2v. CHARGING ANY INDIVIDUAL LIPO CELL ABOVE 4.2v WILL DAMAGE IT.

Pit Tip: Charge on a non-combustible/non-meltable surface. I use an old porcelain floor tile I had lying around. Saves your workbench/window-sill if something goes wrong.

Using your LiPo

DISCHARGING ANY INDIVIDUAL LIPO CELL BELOW 3v WILL DAMAGE IT.

You should always check that your Electronic Speed Control (ESC) has it’s LiPo Low Voltage Cutoff (LVC) enabled, and that it is set to some reasonable value exceeding 3v/cell if user-switchable. Although the ESC manufacturers are trying to be helpful by letting you set it to a value of a particular voltage/cell, the LVC is actually fairly dumb since it can only MEASURE VOLTAGE ACROSS THE WHOLE BATTERY (the balance leads aren’t connected to the ESC). So even though you set the LVC to 3.0v/cell, the ESC actually decides whether you’ve plugged a 2S, 3S or whatever pack into it, and then determines the multiple of 3.0v that it’s going to cutoff at. So when you connect a 2S battery, the ESC thinks “this battery has a voltage somewhere between 6 and 8.4v so it must be a 2S and I’ll therefore cut-off when the voltage drops to 2*the user-selected value = 6v (in this case)”. It’s trying to be smart, but you can imagine that if one of the cells in this 2S pack is going bad, then the ESC won’t see a problem even if one cell was dangerously low at 2.6v and the other was totally fine at 3.5v. The ESC just sees 2.6+3.5 = 6.1v and thinks everything is fine. It’s much safer to set the LVC to something like 3.4v/cell, where a 2S pack would be cutoff at 6.8v.

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Low Voltage Alarm (LVA)

There’s also a small circuit board available for around $5 called a Low Voltage Alarm (LVA). It’s connected only into the balance lead on a battery pack and is small enough to leave in your vehicle while running. Basically it’s a voltmeter with a bloody loud alarm on it, and it’s CONTINUOUSLY MEASURING THE VOLTAGE OF EACH CELL. The voltage at which the alarm sounds it user selectable, but since you’re measuring the voltage of each cell you can set it to just over 3v/cell. It’s a great fail-safe and one that could save your battery.

Storing your LiPo

If you need to leave your LiPo unused for a few days, weeks or months (you know, because it’s wet out!) then putting them safely in a storage condition will keep them lasting longer. This is something lots of people overlook – myself included when I first started using LiPo batteries. STORAGE is when each cell in the battery pack is at 3.85v. It’s just above mid-way between a full charge of 4.2v/cell, and a used battery at 3v/cell. If you’ve run your battery down to 3v/cell then you’ll need to STORAGE CHARGE TO 3.85v/cell. Most chargers have a STORAGE option, which is just like balance charging but it stops at 3.85v/cell not 4.2v/cell.

If for some reason, you didn’t fully use a charged battery, say because you smashed the front corner off your car on a rock. Then you’ll need to DISCHARGE TO THE STORAGE VOLTAGE OF 3.85v/cell. Most chargers had a discharge setting, but it takes a really long time. The single most useful piece of equipment I’ve added to my battery maintenance is a cheap ($30max) 150watt DISCHARGER/BALANCER that takes your battery pack down to 3.85v/cell, or balances mismatched cells if you forgot to balance charge. There’s lots of similar looking devices out there on eBay/Amazon, but make sure you get the one with the light-bulbs on as that’s what gives you a reasonably quick discharge rate.

Discharger

150w LiPo discharger balancer (also available in blue!)

Store your LiPos disconnected from your vehicles, and in a sturdy container, so they can’t get damaged or punctured.

Pit Tip: I store my LiPos inside an ammo can, with some foam washing-up sponges cut to stop the batteries moving around and banging into one another. However, do take the rubber seal out of the lid to avoid creating a pressurized bomb if one of the batteries leaks/explodes inside the can.

Taking care of your LiPos will make them last longer and keep you safe

If you have any questions, or corrections then feel free to get in touch.

 

Halifax Radio Controlled Park – Updates

Just an handful of updates concerning Halifax Radio Control Park:

Maintenance: The track and surrounding area was given a full trim last night so the weeds and grass are short and it’s ready to go. Apologies to the two guys with the Traxxas Slash’s that we kicked off when we arrived with the mower and weed wacker – Hope you come back again soon.

Drivers Stand: The drivers stand saga looks to be over – and not in a good way. The requirements placed upon us by the city (HRM) has made the prospect of getting a true vandal-proof drivers stand installed at the park pretty much impossible. A wooden deck-like construction is vulnerable to fire and general abuse so was never really an option for us. Our hope was to re-purpose some metal pallet racking, but unless it’s installed with engineers calculations and sign-off, then it’s not allowed, and the liability assumed by that engineer makes it a hard sell from a professional standpoint. Plus we’d have to pay some ongoing fee to HRM on the square-footage of any structure placed on the site. Unfortunately we’ll have to make do with the bleachers we have, and the drivers mound that is in place. Personally I’d recommend bringing a step-stool for the top of the drivers mound for a better perspective.

However, the city have said that they’d help us with signage and mowing the park, even if the maintenance of the track itself remains the committee’s/community’s responsibility. We’re still waiting on the first mow and wack though! And some official signs will help ensure that park is being used in an appropriate way.

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Regional Racing: To those of you thinking of attending some organised racing, there’s another round at Cap Pele this Saturday (23rd Sept) about 2.5hrs from Halifax. George puts on a great event and there’s classes for all types of R/C and drivers of all skill levels are accommodated. Locally it’s not often that you get to run with a full timing system which shows you how you’re improving. More details on the facebook link above.

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♫ Rake and Roll ♫

It seems like every weekend this summer has had some rain. So certain we were that we’d have rain at the weekend, we actually scheduled a bit of track maintenance for a weekday. So yesterday, a Monday – so guaranteed no rain right (And to make our theory valid it rained a lot on Saturday and some on Sunday!), I got the lawn tractor, drag-rake, and roller loaded into a U-haul trailer and out to Halifax RC Park. Along with mower and whipper-snipper work by two more of your hard working committee we spent the day refreshing the track. The rake did a good job of pulling up some of the weeds, smoothing some bumps and loosening some stones from the surface generally leaving the track surface looking like it had just hosted an entire weekend of 1/8 buggy/truggy racing. A quick roll packed down the loose dirt. And wipper-snipping around the BigO track marking and final mow of the track on the lowest setting gives a usable and race-able surface.

The track surface certainly isn’t vegetation-free like it was back in 2015, and over time you’ll see the surface resemble a grass-track. But that isn’t a bad thing for a public R/C facility. Grass tracks are popular in Europe, keep the dust down, the R/C cars cleaner and are easier for the small HRCP committee to maintain with a couple of mows and whipper-snipping sessions a week. The grass helps hold the dirt together so the surface remains smoother and consistent over time, and rocks aren’t so easily exposed or dug up.

We ran a couple of Short Course Trucks around the track yesterday afternoon and it was much much better than before. There’s still a couple of sections with bumps that we’ll need to rectify – by making a small bump into a bigger jump!

We’re hoping for success in this long-term plan and one of the great ways to keep the weeds down is to use the track. So have at er!

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Fighting the weather

So our successes rate of planned track maintenance vs. actual maintenance this season hasn’t been very good. We’ve had more rained-off work parties than actual work parties. We’ll continue to work on the track throughout the season, and if anyone is feeling enthusiastic then adding features or making repairs yourself can be carried out at any time. But the track is most certainly open and ready to use. You’ll find it a little bumpy in places, but as time goes on, and we carry out more maintenance, that should improve.

EDIT: We’ve added a weather widget to the website to give you the current weather at Halifax RC Park. Should be just over there on the right –>

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Making tracks – more on Saturday 17th June 9am-noon PLANS FOILED AGAIN DUE TO RAIN

The ground was still too wet last Sunday to get machinery to assist with building jumps on the race track at Halifax R/C Park, so all the progress was made by hand. A jump has been built on the outer loop, but this weekend (Saturday 17th 9am-noon) we’ll be back on track with machinery to make some more jumps. If anyone is around to help out then you’re welcome to come along – we’ll even have tools for those without any.